Successful Student Engagement in SHINE Projects

SHINE has been privileged to receive the help of several students who have committed time, energy and passion to SHINE projects over the past few years. Read below to learn how they contributed and what they are up to now.

Vanessa Barr

Bachelor of Health Sciences program, University of Calgary (2014)

 

Project Involvement: Supervision and mentorship in the 2014 Global Health Field School, Tanzania. Co-supervisor of undergraduate honors thesis. Menstrual hygiene management among pastoralist women in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania.

"My fond experiences with Project SHINE were formed under the sparse shade of sharp acacia trees, to the sound of dry grass chafing in the soft breeze, under omnipresent sunshine and expansive starry skies while living in camp near Endulen as a field school student. Days were spent building rapport and relationships, tumbling around the countryside in Land Rovers to distant communities with lively schools overflowing with students, and holding space for the amazing Tanzanian (Maasai and non-Maasai) community members who have so much wisdom and insight on water, sanitation, hygiene, the environment, and the socioeconomic factors of living within a conservation area. My thesis work emerged from the knowledge that was graciously shared with us, diving into the intersection of gender and menstrual management within this complex, special place. My work since then has always equally straddled the realms of social and medical issues; currently I am mostly in a role of providing crisis support, counselling, and case planning to Indigenous and non- Indigenous youth facing mental health, addictions, trauma, homelessness, and systemic inequalities in Coast Salish Territory. I also teach trauma-sensitive yoga to adult men in a federal prison, run an adventure therapy program for at-risk youth that encourages them to go inside themselves by really going outside into nature (hiking, climbing, skateboarding, etc.), and recently completed a contract in Zambia working on gender based violence. No matter where in the world I am or what I am doing, it all comes down to human interconnectedness, connection to land, and a sense of adventure." 

Erika Friebe

Bachelor of Health Sciences program, University of Calgary (2015)

 

Project Involvement: Development and evaluation of program targeting secondary school students in rural Tanzania to increase capacity to engage in global health promotion and social entrepreneurship initiatives.

Erika was part of the Project SHINE team in 2015. Her work centred on evaluating the potential for youth driven social entrepreneurship as a means to promote local sanitation and hygiene strategies. To this end, she contributed to development of a social entrepreneurship curriculum and series of teacher workshops. Following her field school engagement, Erika used the Project SHINE intervention as a case study in her BHSc Honors thesis which explored youth-driven health promotion in low and middle income countries and the unintended consequences of empowerment-based interventions.

Erika is now a first year medical student at the University of Calgary. She is pursuing her interest in global health through her position as Global Health and Climate Change Advocate within the Calgary Medical Students Association.

Lindsay Delmar

Bachelor of Health Sciences program, University of Calgary (2015) 

 

Project Involvement: Development of knowledge translation tools to engage and mobilize pastoralist youth and communities in rural Tanzania to improve water, sanitation and hygiene.

"My involvement with the SHINE project began in 2015 when I assisted with the statistical analysis of sanitation and hygiene survey data collected from school aged children in a rural and remote Tanzania. I created visual 'infographics' from the data and helped plan a series of workshops to deliver to the students during a trip to the region. I was able to work with documentary film-maker Rick Castiglione to create video storybooks that documented the student led innovation and inspiring science projects about sanitation and hygiene solutions. It was truly a pleasure to be involved with such forward-thinking and creative students during my time with project SHINE! I am currently completing my MD degree at the University of Alberta. I am absolutely loving learning about medicine and patient care and hope to tie my background in public/global health with a career in surgery one day. I feel passionate about developing medical education in low to middle income countries and can see myself working overseas with some type of capacity building project one day."

Lauren Hebert

Bachelor of Health Sciences program, University of Calgary (2016)

 

Project Involvement: Participant in the 2016 Tanzania Global Health Field School with a focus on gender and water-related issues. “Water issues are women’s issues”: Understanding water-related issues from the perspective of pastoralist women in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania.

Lauren Hebert is a 4th year Bachelor of Health Sciences student with a major in Biomedical Science and a minor in Health and Society at the University of Calgary. Lauren attended the Global Health Field School in the summer of 2016 where she worked with Tina, Lise and Dr. Bastien on Project SHINE. Specifically, her project focused on developing a broader understanding of water-related issues, specifically water scarcity, water quality, and women’s roles in regards to water through in-depth interviews, group discussions and think tanks. Upon graduation, Lauren will begin law school with the aim of pursuing a career in health law.

Marissa Nahirney

Bachelor of Health Sciences program, University of Calgary (2017)

Marissa Nahirney is currently completing her final year of a Bachelor of Health Sciences degree, with a goal to pursue a global health masters degree and medical school. She worked with Project SHINE in the summer of 2017 in efforts to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the biosand water filters one-year post-implementation. Alongside a fellow student, Marissa worked closely with BSF project coordinators and communities to understand the benefits and challenges of using the filters. This valuable field experience has motivated her to present her results across Alberta and in New York, with an aim to disseminate BSF information for greater implementation internationally.

Mairead Whelan

Bachelor of Health Sciences program, University of Calgary (2017)

"I am a Bachelor of Health Sciences student at the University of Calgary, and I participated in the 2017 Tanzania Field School rotation working with Project SHINE on the follow-up assessment of BioSand Filters in Maasai households. My time with SHINE  sparked a love for water-related public health, which I hope to pursue through future graduate studies in global water resource management. I am currently going into my last year of my undergraduate program and will start an honours thesis in the fall, where I will be continuing with a global health focus and studying the risk of emerging infectious water-borne illness on farms in Vietnam. I have translated my work with the BSF in Tanzania to Calgary where I now volunteer with the local organization CAWST. I run interactive workshops with elementary school children to teach them about household water, sanitation and global hygiene issues."

Lise Hovden

Norwegian University of Life Sciences (2016)

 

Project Involvement: Unintended consequences of public health interventions: a pilot study of the biosand water filter in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania.

"I have been a part of the SHINE team since 2016. As a part of my master thesis I had the privilege to participate in the annual global health field school held in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area (NCA) in Tanzania. My study sought to develop an understanding of community perceptions related to water scarcity and quality, and how this affects the Maasai pastoralists as a foundation for understanding the context in which the biosand water filter (BSF) study is being implemented. In addition, the study aimed to engage and identify community perspectives concerning potential unintended harms and mitigation strategies, related to the implementation of the BSF. I currently work as a nurse in Oslo, Norway."

Tina Paasche

Norwegian University of Life Sciences (2016)

 

Project Involvement: Biosand water filter evaluation: community feasibility and acceptability pilot study in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania.

"My work with SHINE started when I took part in the 2016 field school in Endulen, Tanzania. During field school, I collected data for my master thesis: "The Biosand Filter - A pilot evaluation study to investigate perceived community acceptability and feasibility among Maasai pastoralists in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania". After completion of my master thesis I worked with SHINE as a volunteer research assistant. Among other tasks, I have assisted with data collection at a follow-up study in Tanzania, and delivered a workshop related to water quality and water treatment options to teachers at a local school in Vellore, India. Now, I work as a public health coordinator in another rural and remote place in Norway…slightly further north than Endulen and Vellore!"

Anise Gold-Watts

Department of Public Health Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (2016 - Present)

 

PhD Dissertation: Adaptation and implementation of Project SHINE, an innovative school and community-based intervention to improve water, sanitation and hygiene among youth and communities in South Asia.

"I am a Doctoral Research Fellow at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences and I am currently coordinating Project SHINE in Sripuram, India. As part of my PhD, I have contributed to adapting Project SHINE to the Indian context and spearheaded two SHINE-related research sub-studies. I have a Master of Public Health degree in Health Behavior from the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill."

Marte Hovdenak

University of Bergen (UiB) (Present)

"I currently study at the University of Bergen (UiB) and joined SHINE as an intern on the project. I have a Bachelors in International Relations from Queen Mary University of London, and am currently doing a Masters in Global Development with a specialization in health promotion at UiB. Within the field of water, sanitation and hygiene I have a particular interest in menstrual hygiene management and recently collected data for my thesis on this issue through SHINE India."

Raida Khwaja

Bachelor of Health Sciences program, University of Calgary (2014, 2015)

 

Project Involvement: Participation in the 2014, 2015 Global Health Field School, Tanzania. Development and evaluation of teacher workshops to increase knowledge and capacity to deliver participatory science lessons concerning water quality, testing, treatment and health in rural Tanzania.

 

Academic Publications 2015 - 2017

Hetherington, E., Eggers, M., Wamoyi, J., Hatfield, J., Manyama, M., Bastien, S. (2017). Participatory Science and Innovation for Improved Sanitation and Hygiene: Process and Outcome Evaluation of Project SHINE, a School-based Intervention in Rural Tanzania. BMC Public Health.

 

Bastien, S., Hetherington, E., Hatfield, J., Williams, K.L., Manyama, M. (2017). The development of an innovative OneHealth Sanitation Science Fair to address global health challenges with pastoralist youth in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania. In: Bastien, S., Holmarsdottir, H (Eds.), Youth as Architects of Change: Global Efforts to Advance Youth-Driven Innovation for Social Change. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Bastien, S., Hatfield, J., Hetherington, E., Manyama, M. (2015). Neglected voices, neglected diseases, igniting youth driven innovation in sanitation solutions for Maasai pastoralists in Tanzania: project design and conceptual framework. Global Journal of Health Education and Promotion 16(3): 14-3.

 

Henderson, R., Hatfield, J., Kutz, S., Manyama, M., Bastien, S. (2015). “You can’t get worms from cow dung”: reported knowledge of parasitism among pastoralists in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania. Journal of Biosocial Science.

 

Conference Presentations 2014 - 2017

November 2017. Nahirney, M., Hatfield, J., Whelan, M., McLean, J., Nyanza, E.C., Seni, J., Orsel, K. van der Meer, F., Bastien, S. Ownership versus operation of the biosand water filter: Exploring traditional household and community power dynamics in northern rural Tanzania. Consortium of Universities for Global Health, New York.

November 2017. Whelan, M., Hatfield, J., Hovden, L., Mclean, J., Nahirney, M., Nyanza, E.C., Orsel, K., Paasche, T., van der Meer, F., Seni, S., Bastien, S. Evaluating the sustainability of Bio-Sand filter technology in Maasai households: Findings from a pilot intervention study in rural Northern Tanzania. Canadian Conference on Global Health, Ottawa, Canada.

November 2016. Hebert, L., Nyanza, E., Hovden, L., Pasche, T., Bastien, S. “Water issues are women’s issues”: Understanding water-related issues from the perspective of pastoralist women in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania. Canadian Conference on Global Health, Ottawa, Canada.

November 2015. Friebe, E., Hetherington, E., Allen-Scott, L., Hatfield, J., van der Meer, F., Manyama, M., Charles, E., Bastien S. Motivation for the integration of social entrepreneurship in secondary schools to enhance sanitation and hygiene: an experience from rural Tanzania. Canadian Conference on Global Health, Montreal, Canada.

 

September 2015. Khwaja, R. Henderson, R. Barr, V., Hetherington, H., Williams, K., Kutz, S., Hatfield, J., Manyama, M., Oleshumba, S., Bastien, S. Building local capacity with participatory science workshops to address water, sanitation and hygiene challenges in rural northern Tanzania. Campus Alberta Student Health Conference. Banff, Canada.

 

November 2014. Bastien, S., Hetherington, E., Hatfield, J.M., Schroeder, A., Manyama, M. “Youth driven innovation in sanitation solutions for Maasai pastoralists in Tanzania: conceptual framework and project SHINE design”. Poster presentation. Canadian Conference on Global Health. Ottawa, Canada.

 

November 2014. Allen-Scott, L.K., Bastien, S., Manyama, M., Hatfield, J.M. “Consideration of harmful unintended consequences during planning and implementation of a sanitation and hygiene youth-driven intervention in Tanzania: a case study”. Poster presentation. Canadian Conference on Global Health. Ottawa, Canada.

 

November 2014. Barr, V., Hatfield, J.M., Henderson, R., Manyama, M., Bastien, S. “Generational perspectives on sanitation, hygiene and menstruation among pastoralist Maasai females in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area of Tanzania”. Poster presentation. Canadian Conference on Global Health. Ottawa, Canada.

 

November 2014. Henderson, R., Hatfield, J., Kutz, S., Manyama, M., Bastien S. “We can’t get worms from cow dung”: reported knowledge of parasitism among pastoralist youth attending secondary school in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania. Oral presentation. Canadian Conference on Global Health. Ottawa, Canada.

 

October 2014. Van der Meer, F., Schroeder, A., Kutz, S., Bastien, S., Manyama, M., Charles, E., Konje, E., Saningo, G. A One Health community partnership approach on neglected tropical diseases; the case of animal and human parasitism. Poster presentation. One Health Summit. Davos, Switzerland.

 

September 2014. Khwaja, R., Bastien, S., Henderson, R. “Workshops on Parasitism, Sanitation and Hygiene as a Knowledge Sharing and Partnership Development Tool among Pastoralists in Tanzania: Project SHINE as a Case Study”. Campus Alberta Student Conference on Health (CASCH). Poster presentation. Banff, Canada.

 

April 2014. Bastien, S. “Neglected voices, neglected diseases: igniting youth driven innovation in sanitation solutions for Maasai pastoralists.” Yale University, Global Health & Innovation Conference. Social entrepreneurship pitch. New Haven, Connecticut, USA.


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